2020 Book 81: THAT CAN BE ARRANGED by Huda Fahmy

That Can Be Arranged: A Muslim Love Story by Huda Fahmy
ISBN: 9781524856229 (paperback)
ISBN: 9781524861964 (ebook)
ASIN: B084DL8K2R  (Kindle edition)
Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing
Publication Date: March 10, 2020


Chaperones, suitors, and arranged marriages aren’t only reserved for the heroines of a Jane Austen novel. They’re just another walk in the park for this leading lady, who is on a mission to find her leading lad. From the brilliant comics Yes, I’m Hot in This, Huda Fahmy tells the hilarious story of how she met and married her husband. Navigating mismatched suitors, gossiping aunties, and societal expectations for Muslim women, That Can Be Arranged deftly and hilariously reveals to readers what it can be like to find a husband as an observant Muslim woman in the twenty-first century.

So relevant in today’s evolving cultural climate, Fahmy’s story offers a perceptive and personal glimpse into the sometimes sticky but ultimately rewarding balance of independent choice and tradition.





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Imagine you’re a twenty-something-year-old female in a conservative Muslim American family. You’re not allowed to date and you’re not really interested in dating, but you are interested in getting married. (Certain Muslim cultures just don’t allow for dating y’all, get over it.) All of your friends are getting married. Your sisters are getting married. You, on the other hand, are not. This was Huda Fahmy’s life. Huda wasn’t seeking an “arranged marriage” per se, but she was looking for something akin to the marriages found in Jane Austen novels. As a matter of fact, she actually refers to Jane Austen novels in her search for the perfect husband. Muslims (and other cultures) prepare a dossier or “biodata” that is used to “match” compatible couples when all else fails, and at this point in Huda’s life, all else had pretty much failed (or had it). What is in this “biodata” you ask? Ms. Fahmy provides the perfect definition in her book:


“biodata (noun): personal information about one’s life, work, family, personality, goals, financial status, values, beliefs, health history, favorite Pokémon, and other preferences about things both religious and secular. Think super-detailed Tinder profile, except instead of dating, they’d get married.”


That Can Be Arranged: A Muslim Love Story is a quick read but one that had me laughing out loud, choking on my chai, and bookmarking pages to return and read later. Any author/artist that can reference Jane Austen, J.K. Rowling, and Pokémon in one book is beyond amazing in my opinion. Huda’s quest and it was a quest, for a husband was rife with hilarity. Although I know her story ended well (I follow her on social media), I was beginning to believe she might actually become a single cat lady at one point. (Hey, there’s nothing wrong with being single or owning cats). She pokes fun at the meddling aunties (trust me, read the book and you’ll understand this reference) and the variety of suitors she encounters throughout her quest. I cheered when she met Gehad and achieved her happily ever after, this is a love story, it says so in the title! FYI, this isn’t every Muslims’ story but it is one specific Muslimah’s story of growing up in this country and her quest to find love and get married within the bounds of her religious beliefs. Ms. Fahmy tells her story with style, grace, respect for the religion, and quite a bit of humor. Although this graphic novel/memoir discusses bits of Muslim culture and the Islamic faith, this is a book that can be read and appreciated by any reader. If you’re into graphic novels, memoirs, humor, or just want a quick read, I strongly encourage you to grab a copy of That Can Be Arranged: A Muslim Love Story by Huda Fahmy to read. If you can’t tell, I thoroughly enjoyed That Can Be Arranged: A Muslim Love Story and will be re-reading again in the near future. I look forward to reading more from Ms. Fahmy in the future.

Happy Reading y’all! 



Disclaimer: I received a free digital review copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. I was not paid, required, or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Book 7: MWF SEEKING BFF Review

MWF SEEKING BFF: My Yearlong Search for a New Best Friend by Rachel Bertsche
ISBN: 978-0-345-52494-2
Publication date: January 10, 2012
Publisher: Ballantine Books

When Rachel Bertsche first moves to Chicago, she’s thrilled to finally share a zip code, let alone an apartment, with her boyfriend. But shortly after getting married, Bertsche realizes that her new life is missing one thing: friends. Sure, she has plenty of BFFs–in New York and San Francisco and Boston and Washington, D.C.–but nobody in her adopted hometown. Taking matters into her own hands, Bertsche develops a plan: She’ll go on fifty-two friend-dates, one per week for a year, in hopes of meeting her new Best Friend Forever. The result is this thought-provoking, uproarious memoir.  




For many people, male or female, it is difficult to acclimate in a new city or state especially when you don’t know anyone other than your spouse, their co-workers and your co-workers. Some people are able to establish friendships with co-workers that exist outside of the workplace, and others simply can’t because there are no common interests. Some people find new friends with common interests at book clubs, exercise classes, cooking classes or even at places of worship. Rachel tries many of these tactics and more in her search for a new BFF. 

Rachel isn’t a needy, clingy woman that relies on her husband as her sole contact outside of work. She has a full life with friends, family and often traveled out-of-state to weddings, etc. keeping in contact. But we all crave someone to hang out with on the weekends, call when we’re having difficulties at home or work, shop with, etc. Rachel’s friend-dates are her attempts to find this person in her new hometown. She “dates” women that she may have overlooked because they were older, different ethnicities, or simply different. She is highly descriptive in describing these dates and her expectations. 

I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I began reading MWF Seeking BFF simply because I’m not a memoir reader. However I have to say that I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book, although it did seem to drag a little in the middle sections. I don’t know if I could have the chutzpah to put myself out there as Rachel did when she moved, but I can understand her goal and rationale. This book provides a glimpse into why friends are necessary in order to be a well-rounded person, in addition to providing a glimpse into Rachel’s quest for a new BFF. (Couples with close friends apparently do better than couples without close friends according to one quoted sociology study.)  If you enjoy memoirs with a humorous bent then MWF Seeking BFF may be just the book for you.


Disclaimer: I received an copy of this book free for review purposes from the publisher. I was not paid, required or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Book 203: THIS DOESN’T HAPPEN IN THE MOVIES Review

What happens when you take an independently wealthy man with no job experience and a love of classic detective movies? You get Reed Ferguson in This Doesn’t Happen in the Movies by Renee Pawlish.


Reed is in his early thirties and although he was educated to be an attorney, he has never kept a job for long. It doesn’t help that he has just enough inheritance monies that he doesn’t really need to work. Reed is also an avid classic noir detective movie fan. After helping his father’s friend with a small investigation he decides to hang his shingle and open a private detective office. It helps that in Colorado one isn’t required to be licensed. What would any classic detective movie be without the endangered femme fatale? Enter Amanda Ghering with a sob story about her missing husband. Quickly Reed learns that life doesn’t mimic the film arts and he acknowledges he doesn’t have a clue about what he’s doing. He also quickly learns that Amanda has lied to him and there is a lot more to her “missing husband” story than initially thought. A cat-and-mouse game quickly follows between Reed, Amanda, the faux FBI, the real FBI and the nefarious and a secretive group known as the X Women.


In a lot of ways this is a coming-of-age story mixed with a mystery and filled with dark humor. Reed has never had to grow up and assume much responsibility, but now he becomes responsible for the lives of a friend, his family, and his client as well as himself. This Doesn’t Happen in the Movies isn’t a typical mystery/detective story and that makes it rather refreshing. It is precisely because Reed doesn’t know what he’s doing, makes several mistakes along the way, but grows as an individual and professional that made me want to continue reading to see what’s going to happen next. I laughed, I cringed and I enjoyed this fast-paced mystery. I look forward to reading more about Reed Ferguson’s shenanigans in the future. This Doesn’t Happen in the Movies is available as an ebook from Smashwords and Amazon.

Disclaimer: I received this book free for review purposes from the author. I was not paid, required or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”