Book Showcase: LOCAL WOMAN MISSING by Mary Kubica

LOCAL WOMAN MISSING - MKubicaLocal Woman Missing by Mary Kubica
ISBN: 9780778389446 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9781488073960 (ebook)
ISBN: 9781488211690 (digital audiobook)
ASIN: B08PDWGPSB (Audible audiobook)
ASIN: B08DKZX3FX (Kindle edition)
Publisher: Park Row Books
Release Date: May 18, 2021
Genre: Fiction | Suspense | Crime Thrillers | Psychological Thriller

 
 People don’t just disappear without a trace…

Shelby Tebow is the first to go missing. Not long after, Meredith Dickey and her six-year-old daughter, Delilah, vanish just blocks away from where Shelby was last seen, striking fear into their once-peaceful community. Are these incidents connected? After an elusive search that yields more questions than answers, the case eventually goes cold.

Now, eleven years later, Delilah shockingly returns. Everyone wants to know what happened to her, but no one is prepared for what they’ll find…

In this smart and chilling thriller, master of suspense and New York Times bestselling author Mary Kubica takes domestic secrets to a whole new level, showing that some people will stop at nothing to keep the truth buried.

 
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Read An Excerpt:

MEREDITH

11 YEARS BEFORE

March

The text comes from a number I don’t know. It’s a 630 area code. Local. I’m in the bathroom with Leo as he soaks in the tub. He has his bath toys lined up on the edge of it and they’re taking turns swan diving into the now-lukewarm water. It used to be hot, too hot for Leo to get into. But he’s been in there for thirty minutes now playing with his octopus, his whale, his fish. He’s having a ball.

Meanwhile I’ve lost track of time. I have a client in the early stages of labor. We’re texting. Her husband wants to take her to the hospital. She thinks it’s too soon. Her contractions are six and a half minutes apart. She’s absolutely correct. It’s too soon. The hospital would just send her home, which is frustrating, not to mention a huge inconvenience for women in labor. And anyway, why labor at the hospital when you can labor in the comfort of your own home? First-time fathers always get skittish. It does their wives no good. By the time I get to them, more times than not, the woman in labor is the more calm of the two. I have to focus my attention on pacifying a nervous husband. It’s not what they’re paying me for.

I tell Leo one more minute until I shampoo his hair, and then fire off a quick text, suggesting my client have a snack to keep her energy up, herself nourished. I recommend a nap, if her body will let her. The night ahead will be long for all of us. Childbirth, especially when it comes to first-time moms, is a marathon, not a sprint.

Josh is home. He’s in the kitchen cleaning up from dinner while Delilah plays. Delilah’s due up next in the tub. By the time I leave, the bedtime ritual will be done or nearly done. I feel good about that, hating the times I leave Josh alone with so much to do.

I draw up my text and then hit Send. The reply is immediate, that all too familiar ping that comes to me at all hours of the day or night.

I glance down at the phone in my hand, expecting it’s my client with some conditioned reply. Thx.

Instead: I know what you did. I hope you die.

Beside the text is a picture of a grayish skull with large, black eye sockets and teeth. The symbol of death.

My muscles tense. My heart quickens. I feel thrown off. The small bathroom feels suddenly, overwhelmingly, oppressive. It’s steamy, moist, hot. I drop down to the toilet and have a seat on the lid. My pulse is loud, audible in my own ears. I stare at the words before me, wondering if I’ve misread. Certainly I’ve misread. Leo is asking, “Is it a minute, Mommy?” I hear his little voice, muff led by the ringing in my ears. But I’m so thrown by the cutthroat text that I can’t speak.

I glance at the phone again. I haven’t misread.

The text is not from my client in labor. It’s not from any client of mine whose name and number is stored in my phone. As far as I can tell, it’s not from anyone I know.

A wrong number, then, I think. Someone sent this to me by accident. It has to be. My first thought is to delete it, to pretend this never happened. To make it disappear. Out of sight, out of mind.

But then I think of whoever sent it just sending it again or sending something worse. I can’t imagine anything worse.

I decide to reply. I’m careful to keep it to the point, to not sound too judgy or fault-finding because maybe the intended recipient really did do something awful—stole money from a children’s cancer charity—and the text isn’t as egregious as it looks at first glance.

I text: You have the wrong number.

The response is quick.

I hope you rot in hell, Meredith.

The phone slips from my hand. I yelp. The phone lands on the navy blue bath mat, which absorbs the sound of its fall.

Meredith.

Whoever is sending these texts knows my name. The texts are meant for me.

A second later Josh knocks on the bathroom door. I spring from the toilet seat, and stretch down for the phone. The phone has fallen facedown. I turn it over. The text is still there on the screen, staring back at me.

Josh doesn’t wait to be let in. He opens the door and steps right inside. I slide the phone into the back pocket of my jeans before Josh has a chance to see.

“Hey,” he says, “how about you save some water for the fish.”

Leo complains to Josh that he is cold. “Well, let’s get you out of the bath,” Josh says, stretching down to help him out of the water.

“I need to wash him still,” I admit. Before me, Leo’s teeth chatter. There are goose bumps on his arm that I hadn’t noticed before. He is cold, and I feel suddenly guilty, though it’s mired in confusion and fear. I hadn’t been paying any attention to Leo. There is bathwater spilled all over the floor, but his hair is still bone-dry.

“You haven’t washed him?” Josh asks, and I know what he’s thinking: that in the time it took him to clear the kitchen table, wash pots and pans and wipe down the sinks, I did nothing. He isn’t angry or accusatory about it. Josh isn’t the type to get angry.

“I have a client in labor,” I say by means of explanation. “She keeps texting,” I say, telling Josh that I was just about to wash Leo. I drop to my knees beside the tub. I reach for the shampoo. In the back pocket of my jeans, the phone again pings. This time, I ignore it. I don’t want Josh to know what’s happening, not until I get a handle on it for myself.

Josh asks, “Aren’t you going to get that?” I say that it can wait. I focus on Leo, on scrubbing the shampoo onto his hair, but I’m anxious. I move too fast so that the shampoo suds get in his eye. I see it happening, but all I can think to do is wipe it from his forehead with my own soapy hands. It doesn’t help. It makes it worse.

Leo complains. Leo isn’t much of a complainer. He’s an easygoing kid. “Ow,” is all that he says, his tiny wet hands going to his eyes, though shampoo in the eye burns like hell.

“Does that sting, baby?” I ask, feeling contrite. But I’m bursting with nervous energy. There’s only one thought racing through my mind. I hope you rot in hell, Meredith.

Who would have sent that, and why? Whoever it is knows me. They know my name. They’re mad at me for something I’ve done. Mad enough to wish me dead. I don’t know anyone like that. I can’t think of anything I’ve done to upset someone enough that they’d want me dead.

I grab the wet washcloth draped over the edge of the tub. I try handing it to Leo, so that he can press it to his own eyes. But my hands shake as I do. I wind up dropping the washcloth into the bath. The tepid water rises up and splashes him in the eyes. This time he cries.

“Oh, buddy,” I say, “I’m so sorry, it slipped.”

But as I try again to grab it from the water and hand it to him, I drop the washcloth for a second time. I leave it where it is, letting Leo fish it out of the water and wipe his eyes for himself. Meanwhile Josh stands two feet behind, watching.

My phone pings again. Josh says, “Someone is really dying to talk to you.”

Dying. It’s all that I hear.

My back is to Josh, thank God. He can’t see the look on my face when he says it.

“What’s that?” I ask.

“Your client,” Josh says. I turn to him. He motions to my phone jutting out of my back pocket. “She really needs you. You should take it, Mer,” he says softly, accommodatingly, and only then do I think about my client in labor and feel guilty. What if it is her? What if her contractions are coming more quickly now and she does need me?

Josh says, “I can finish up with Leo while you get ready to go,” and I acquiesce, because I need to get out of here. I need to know if the texts coming to my phone are from my client or if they’re coming from someone else.

I rise up from the floor. I scoot past Josh in the door, brushing against him. His hand closes around my upper arm as I do, and he draws me in for a hug. “Everything okay?” he asks, and I say yes, fine, sounding too chipper even to my own ears. Everything is not okay.

“I’m just thinking about my client,” I say. “She’s had a stillbirth before, at thirty-two weeks. She never thought she’d get this far. Can you imagine that? Losing a baby at thirty-two weeks?”

Josh says no. His eyes move to Leo and he looks saddened by it. I feel guilty for the lie. It’s not this client but another who lost a baby at thirty-two weeks. When she told me about it, I was completely torn up. It took everything in me not to cry as she described for me the moment the doctor told her her baby didn’t have a heartbeat. Labor was later induced, and she had to push her dead baby out with only her mother by her side. Her husband was deployed at the time. After, she was snowed under by guilt. Was it her fault the baby died? A thousand times I held her hand and told her no. I’m not sure she ever believed me.

My lie has the desired effect. Josh stands down, and asks if I need help with anything before I leave. I say no, that I’m just going to change my clothes and go.

I step out of the bathroom. In the bedroom, I close the door. I grab my scrub bottoms and a long-sleeved T-shirt from my drawer. I lay them on the bed, but before I get dressed, I pull my phone out of my pocket. I take a deep breath and hold it in, summoning the courage to look. I wonder what waits there. More nasty threats? My heart hammers inside me. My knees shake.

I take a look. There are two messages waiting for me.

The first: Water broke. Contractions 5 min apart.

And then: Heading to hospital.—M.

I release my pent-up breath. The texts are from my client’s husband, sent from her phone. My legs nearly give in relief, and I drop down to the edge of the bed, forcing myself to breathe. I inhale long and deep. I hold it in until my lungs become uncomfortable. When I breathe out, I try and force away the tension.

But I can’t sit long because my client is advancing quickly. I need to go.

Excerpt from Local Woman Missing by Mary Kyrychenko.

Copyright © 2021 by Mary Kyrychenko. Published by Park Row Books.

All Rights Reserved. Used With Permission.

 

Meet The Author

Author - Mary Kubica photo credit Sarah Jastre

Mary Kubica is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of six novels, including The Good Girl, Pretty Baby, Don’t You Cry, Every Last Lie, When The Lights Go Out, and The Other Mrs. A former high school history teacher, Mary holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in History and American Literature. She lives outside of Chicago with her husband and two children. Her last novel The Other Mrs. was an instant New York Times bestseller; is coming soon to Netflix; was a LibraryReads pick for February 2020; praised by the New York Times; and highly recommended by Entertainment Weekly, People, The Week, Marie Claire, Bustle, HelloGiggles, Goodreads, PopSugar, BookRiot, HuffingtonPost, First for Women, Woman’s World, and more. Mary’s novels have been translated into over thirty languages and have sold over two million copies worldwide. She’s been described as “a helluva storyteller,” (Kirkus Reviews) and “a writer of vice-like control,” (Chicago Tribune), and her novels have been praised as “hypnotic” (People) and “thrilling and illuminating” (Los Angeles Times). Local Woman Missing is her seventh novel.

Connect with the Author:  Facebook | Goodreads | Instagram | Twitter | Website

  

This excerpt brought to you courtesy of Park Row Books

2020 Book 62: THE OTHER MRS. by Mary Kubica

The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica
ISBN: 9780778369110 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9781488099601 (ebook)
ISBN: 9781488208157 (audiobook – digital)
ISBN: 9781094097886 (audiobook – CD)
ASIN: B07XVPBRMV  (Audible audiobook)
ASIN: B07PRMP8GY  (Kindle edition)
Publisher: Park Row Books
Publication Date: February 18, 2020


Propulsive and addictive, The Other Mrs. is the twisty new psychological thriller from Mary Kubica, the New York Times bestselling author of The Good Girl

She tried to run, but she can’t escape the other Mrs.

Sadie and Will Foust have only just moved their family from bustling Chicago to small-town Maine when their neighbor Morgan Baines is found dead in her home. The murder rocks their tiny coastal island, but no one is more shaken than Sadie.

But it’s not just Morgan’s death that has Sadie on edge. And as the eyes of suspicion turn toward the new family in town, Sadie is drawn deeper into the mystery of what really happened that dark and deadly night. But Sadie must be careful, for the more she discovers about Mrs. Baines, the more she begins to realize just how much she has to lose if the truth ever comes to light.





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Will and Dr. Sadie Fount have relocated their family from Chicago, Illinois to a small coastal island in Maine. Ostensibly the reason for this relocation is Will’s sister’s death by suicide and their guardianship over Will’s 16-year-old niece Imogen. Reality is a bit more nuanced than that. Their eldest son Otto was being bullied at school and facing expulsion for bringing a knife to school. Sadie dealt with a death from a routine procedure at her job as an emergency room physician, suffered a bit of a breakdown, and subsequently resigned rather than deal with seeing a therapist. The only two members of the family that apparently had no issues in Chicago and are having no difficulties adjusting to life in Maine are Will and 7-year-old Tate. The move has been difficult for 14-year-old Otto and Will’s niece doesn’t seem to want anyone around, much less her uncle and his family. Sadie is trying to adapt to being a small-town physician, her marriage is a bit shaky, and she’s experiencing some lost time. She initially writes this off as being due to the change from city to more rural life, the bustle of the small-town medical practice versus the well-staffed metropolitan emergency room, and just living in a somewhat gloomy house where someone died by suicide. Things aren’t great in Maine, but they are progressing until one of the Founts’ neighbors is found murdered, discovered by the woman’s 6-year-old stepdaughter while the child’s father is traveling out of the country on business. Based on a neighbor’s report of an argument between Sadie and the murdered woman, the police zero in on Sadie as a person-of-interest and she didn’t even know the woman that was killed? As the island police investigate the murder, Sadie begins to question everything and everyone around her. Why has Imogen said things to Sadie that she then denies to Will? Why does Imogen keep her room padlocked? Why has Otto become so hostile and aloof? And why do people keep saying they’ve seen Sadie doing or saying things that she’d never do or say in places she’s never been? Is someone trying to frame her for murder? If so, what’s the motive? Can Sadie uncover the truth before she becomes the next victim?

I’ve had the pleasure of reading all of the previous books by Mary Kubica so I knew I had to read The Other Mrs. when offered the chance and am I so glad I accepted that offer! The Other Mrs. was a dark and twisted read and I mean that in the best possible way. Just when I thought I knew where the story was going, the author threw a nice twist into play and I was left guessing again. This story is told in alternating perspectives of three characters, Sadie Fount, who we know is married to Will, a practicing physician, and mother of two boys. The other two voices we know very little about other than what they reveal. Camille is apparently someone that Will met before Sadie and someone he’s continued to have an affair with throughout his marriage to Sadie. Camille is the jealous stalker type and comes across as one scary lady. The third voice is that of Mouse a 6-year-old girl. All we know about Mouse is that she lives with her father until he brings home a new wife. Mouse’s stepmother is physically, mentally, and emotionally abusive but commits all of the abuse when the father is traveling for work. There is a lot to parse and unpack with The Other Mrs. and I can’t tell you too much because then you’ll know what’s happening, who did it, and why. What I will say is that this is an amazing read that deals with a host of issues including suicide, murder, bullying, gaslighting, and mental health issues. I can also tell you to expect the unexpected and prepare for one heck of a read with The Other Mrs. For those of you that love psychological suspense/psychological thrillers, The Other Mrs. may just be the perfect book for you. For those of you that have read other books by Mary Kubica in the past, I probably don’t have to tell you to grab a copy of this book because it’s probably already on your TBR list, but just in case you haven’t already decided to read this one, put it on your list. Actually, put it on the top of your TBR list because you’ll want to read this one as soon as possible. I enjoyed reading The Other Mrs. and look forward to rereading again in the future just to make sure I didn’t miss anything the first time around.

Happy Reading y’all! 



Disclaimer: I received a free digital review copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss+. I was not paid, required, or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

2018 Book 341: WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT by Mary Kubica

When The Lights Go Out by Mary Kubica
ISBN: 9780778330783 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9780778316893 (trade paperback)
ISBN: 9781848456709 (paperback)
ISBN: 9781488023576 (ebook)
ISBN: 9781488205071 (audiobook)
ASIN: B076PNB3MB (Kindle edition)

Publisher: Park Row

Release Date: September 4, 2018 


A woman is forced to question her own identity in this riveting and emotionally charged thriller by the blockbuster bestselling author of The Good Girl, Mary Kubica 

Jessie Sloane is on the path to rebuilding her life after years of caring for her ailing mother. She rents a new apartment and applies for college. But when the college informs her that her social security number has raised a red flag, Jessie discovers a shocking detail that causes her to doubt everything she’s ever known.

Finding herself suddenly at the center of a bizarre mystery, Jessie tumbles down a rabbit hole, which is only exacerbated by grief and a relentless lack of sleep. As days pass and the insomnia worsens, it plays with Jessie’s mind. Her judgment is blurred, her thoughts are hampered by fatigue. Jessie begins to see things until she can no longer tell the difference between what’s real and what she’s only imagined.

Meanwhile, twenty years earlier and two hundred and fifty miles away, another woman’s split-second decision may hold the key to Jessie’s secret past. Has Jessie’s whole life been a lie or have her delusions gotten the best of her?    



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For as long as she can remember, it’s always been just Jessie and her mother. Now that her mother has died of metastatic breast cancer, Jessie is all alone. She has no close friends and no family. She’s not quite sure what to do with her life but she’s thinking of college and that’s when her life begins to unravel. First, she’s having difficulty sleeping. Okay, she’s not having difficulty sleeping, she can’t sleep at all, and she knows that the longer she goes without sleep the worse things will become for her healthwise. Second, her FAFSA or financial aid form has been “rejected” because her social security card is tied to the identity of a deceased person. Now Jessie must prove that she is who she is, only she can’t find her birth certificate or her social security card. The longer Jessie goes without sleep, the more disconnected from reality she becomes and she begins to think that she may have been kidnapped as a child or worse. As the lines between reality and Jessie’s overactive imagination begin to blur even more, can she discover the truth before it’s too late?

When The Lights Go Out is the fifth book released by Mary Kubica and I’ve had the pleasure of reading all of her books. This is one of those books that isn’t quite what it seems from beginning to end (no, I’m not going to spoil the ending!). The story is told in the alternating voices of Jessie in the present day and her mother Eden from the past to just a few years ago. The reader gets to bear witness to the pain and despair of infertility and infertility treatments firsthand via Eden’s memories, as well as the pain and despair Jessie feels over the death of her mother and her loss of sense of self and identity. As Eden’s story unfolds, the reader begins to imagine the unthinkable that perhaps Jessie was correct and she was kidnapped as a child. It is hard to read either story without feeling a sense of empathy and overwhelming compassion for both Eden and Jessie. Eden becomes just as lost as Jessie as her quest to become pregnant unravels with an unexpected miscarriage followed by a divorce when her then-husband no longer wants to continue with the costly IVF treatments. However, Jessie’s sense of loss seems more harrowing because she’s lost her mother, her identity, and seems to be losing her mind as well. Ms. Kubica has a way of writing that draws the reader into the story, or at least this reader, and I kept turning the pages to find out what would happen next (and no, I’m not going to reveal what happens next, read the book). I will say that When The Lights Go Out is dramatically different from previous books by Ms. Kubica, but I thoroughly enjoyed the story, characters, action, and settings. This story does provide psychological suspense, lots of drama, and tons of twists and turns to keep the reader on edge. If that sounds appealing to you, then I urge you to grab a copy of When The Lights Go Out to read. If you’re not quite sure about the psychological suspense, then I urge you to grab a copy of When The Lights Go Out simply for the drama and twists and turns. I hope you won’t be disappointed.  


Disclaimer:  I received a free digital review copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss+. I was not paid, required, or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the





Meet the Author



Mary Kubica is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of The Good Girl and Pretty Baby.  She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, in History and American Literature. She lives outside of Chicago with her husband and two children and enjoys photography, gardening and caring for the animals at a local shelter.





Connect with Mary via  Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram



This review and blog tour brought to you by TLC Book Tours




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When the Lights Go Out

When the Lights Go Out

When the Lights Go Out

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When the Lights Go Out

2017 Book 203: EVERY LAST LIE by Mary Kubica

Every Last Lie by Mary Kubica 
ISBN: 9780778319986 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9781460396698 (ebook)
ASIN: B01N0UM130 (Kindle version)
Publication Date: June 27, 2016 
Publisher: Park Row Books 

New York Times bestselling author of THE GOOD GIRL, Mary Kubica is back with another exhilarating thriller as a widow’s pursuit of the truth leads her to the darkest corners of the psyche. 

“The bad man, Daddy. The bad man is after us.” 

Clara Solberg’s world shatters when her husband and their four-year-old daughter are in a car crash, killing Nick while Maisie is remarkably unharmed. The crash is ruled an accident…until the coming days, when Maisie starts having night terrors that make Clara question what really happened on that fateful afternoon. 

Tormented by grief and her obsession that Nick’s death was far more than just an accident, Clara is plunged into a desperate hunt for the truth. Who would have wanted Nick dead? And, more important, why? Clara will stop at nothing to find out—and the truth is only the beginning of this twisted tale of secrets and deceit. 

Told in the alternating perspectives of Clara’s investigation and Nick’s last months leading up to the crash, master of suspense Mary Kubica weaves her most chilling thriller to date—one that explores the dark recesses of a mind plagued by grief and shows that some secrets might be better left buried.


Clara Solberg is a happy, but tired stay-at-home mom. She’s just given birth to her second child and the only thing she truly longs for is a good night sleep. Awaking to find that her husband dead, his business in shambles, his life insurance canceled, her daughter traumatized, and her parents dealing with their own set of problems just might be more than she can handle all at once. These are just a few of the things going on in Every Last Lie by Mary Kubica.

Clara and Nick Solberg are a happy and loving couple. Clara has gladly given up her career in photography to be a stay-at-home mother to their four-year-old daughter Maisie. After Nick’s sudden traumatic death, Clara has to deal with a traumatized Maisie, a newborn infant, a house in constant need of repair, a dwindling amount of income, the possibility that her husband’s car crash might not have been an accident based on her daughter’s night terrors, and her mother’s ever-increasing problems associated with early-onset dementia. Clara is somewhat single-minded in what she is and isn’t willing to deal with, but she’s sure that Nick must have been murdered based on her daughter’s terrors and statements and begins to investigate. Her investigation reveals more than she may have ever wanted to know in some regards, but is she getting closer to the truth or simply uncovering more secrets and lies? Was Nick murdered or was it just a tragic accident?

I’m a huge fan of mystery thrillers, suspense thrillers, and psychological thrillers and Ms. Kubica crafts some of the best thrillers I’ve read and she’s done it yet again with Every Last Lie. I enjoyed this fast-paced story, found it to be part mystery thriller and part psychological thriller, and a wholly entertaining read. I also enjoyed the way Ms. Kubica told this story in alternating viewpoints, so the reader gets to know both Clara and Nick (and let me say there were times I wanted to bop them both upside the head and say “get a grip!”). Are there bad guys in Every Last Lie? Well, yes and no (you’ll need to read the story to discover the truth of this for yourself). There’s a lot of action going on in Every Last Lie and if I told you everything that happened you wouldn’t need to read the book, but I’ll tell you there are hints of marital infidelity, gambling, theft, workplace incompetence/negligence, bullying, marital abuse, and much more. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, if you’re not sure about this genre then I suggest you add all of Ms. Kubica’s titles (The Good Girl, Pretty Baby, Don’t You Cry, and Every Last Lie) to your TBR list, because after reading just one of her books you’re sure to be a fan. If you’ve read any of Ms. Kubica’s previous titles, then you’ll definitely want to grab a copy of Every Last Lie to read.



Read an excerpt from Every Last Lie here


Watch the book trailer for Every Last Lie:



Disclaimer: I received a digital copy of this book for review purposes from the publisher via NetGalley. I was not paid, required, or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”



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Every Last Lie

Every Last Lie

Every Last Lie :  A Gripping Novel of Psychological Suspense

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2016 Book 153: DON’T YOU CRY by Mary Kubica


Don’t You Cry by Mary Kubica 
ISBN: 9780778319054 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9781459294868 (ebook)
ASIN: B0181W5CBU (Kindle version)
Publication Date: May 17, 2016 
Publisher: MIRA


New York Times bestselling author of The Good Girl, Mary Kubica returns with an electrifying and addictive tale of deceit and obsession 

In downtown Chicago, a young woman named Esther Vaughan disappears from her apartment without a trace. A haunting letter addressed to My Dearest is found among her possessions, leaving her friend and roommate Quinn Collins to wonder where Esther is and whether or not she’s the person Quinn thought she knew. 

Meanwhile, in a small Michigan harbor town an hour outside Chicago, a mysterious woman appears in the quiet coffee shop where eighteen-year-old Alex Gallo works as a dishwasher. He is immediately drawn to her charm and beauty, but what starts as an innocent crush quickly spirals into something far more dark and sinister than he ever expected.  

As Quinn searches for answers about Esther, and Alex is drawn further under Pearl’s spell, master of suspense Mary Kubica takes readers on a taut and twisted thrill ride that builds to a stunning conclusion and shows that no matter how fast and far we run, the past always catches up with us in the end.



Quinn Collins awakens on a Sunday morning in Chicago expecting to find her roommate, Esther Vaughan, preparing for church. What she finds instead are an empty bedroom and an open window. Unsure of how to proceed, Quinn searches Esther’s bedroom and finds a weird letter and information that Esther has legally changed her name. That same morning, Alex Gallo is working in a small resort town diner in Michigan and becomes enamored with a customer he calls Pearl. Alex knows nothing about Pearl except she is a distraction from his mundane life. Instead of being away at college, he has stayed in town working a menial job just so he can take care of his alcoholic father. Over the course of one week, both Quinn and Alex come to realize that it isn’t really possible to know another person and that the past is never far from our present in Mary Kubica’s latest release, Don’t You Cry.

I’m a huge fan of suspense thrillers and psychological thrillers and Ms. Kubica has crafted another fine example of a psychological suspense thriller with Don’t You Cry. Even though I was dealing with a migraine, I couldn’t stop thinking about this book and impatiently awaited resuming my reading (yes, it is just that good!). Don’t You Cry pulled this reader in from the first few chapters and kept me enthralled until the very last page. The story is told in alternating voices of Quinn and Alex and the action takes place over the course of one short week. And there’s a lot crammed into that week: remembrances of friendship, family drama, coming-of-age angst, hazards of small town life, hazards of big city life, and hints of romance. I thoroughly enjoyed this fast-paced and gripping story and can highly recommend it to readers of suspense or psychological thrillers. If you’re not sure about this genre, then I suggest you add all three of Ms. Kubica’s titles (The Good Girl, Pretty Baby, and Don’t You Cry) to your TBR list, because after reading just one of her books you’re sure to be a fan.

Read an excerpt from Don’t You Cry here

Disclaimer: I received a digital copy of this book for review purposes from the publisher via NetGalley and a print copy from BookSparks PR. I was not paid, required, or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”




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 Don't You Cry

2015 Book #262: PRETTY BABY by Mary Kubica


Pretty Baby by Mary Kubica
ISBN: 9780778317708 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9781460382288 (ebook)
ASIN: B00S4ZH70Y (Kindle edition)
Publication date: July 28, 2015 
Publisher: MIRA


A chance encounter sparks an unrelenting web of lies in this stunning new psychological thriller from national bestselling author Mary Kubica

She sees the teenage girl on the train platform, standing in the pouring rain, clutching an infant in her arms. She boards a train and is whisked away. But she can’t get the girl out of her head…

Heidi Wood has always been a charitable woman: she works for a nonprofit, takes in stray cats. Still, her husband and daughter are horrified when Heidi returns home one day with a young woman named Willow and her four-month-old baby in tow. Disheveled and apparently homeless, this girl could be a criminal—or worse. But despite her family’s objections, Heidi invites Willow and the baby to take refuge in their home.

Heidi spends the next few days helping Willow get back on her feet, but as clues into Willow’s past begin to surface, Heidi is forced to decide how far she’s willing to go to help a stranger. What starts as an act of kindness quickly spirals into a story far more twisted than anyone could have anticipated.


What do you do when you see an obviously homeless teenage mother out in harsh weather? If you’re most people, you ignore the mother and the crying infant. If you’re socially conscious and a charitable soul like Heidi Wood, you talk to the girl and offer help by bringing the girl back to your home. 

Pretty Baby by Mary Kubica is a fast-paced psychological thriller told in alternating voices of Heidi Wood, her husband Chris, and the teenage mother Willow. The reader gradually learns that Willow has suffered tragedy after tragedy. Her parents die in a car accident when she is eight years old. Her two-year-old sister is adopted and taken out of state. She is initially in a foster home before being sent to live with distant relatives in an ultraconservative and abusive household. Chris is obviously concerned when his wife brings home another “stray,” and his primary concern is for the well-being of his family, especially his twelve-year-old daughter Zoe. Chris is quite sure that Willow is lying about her name and wonders what else she is lying about. Heidi simply wants to help in the only way she knows how and that means bringing Willow home with her after learning she refuses to go to a shelter. She’s concerned about Willow’s welfare, as well as that of Willow’s baby and takes everything she learns from Willow at face value. We also learn that Heidi wanted to have a large family, but a cancer diagnosis forces her to terminate her second pregnancy and suffer through a hysterectomy.

Ms. Kubica is quite adept at creating a story that twists and turns and leaves the reader wondering where the story will end. We know very early in the book that there is an obvious tragic conclusion to Heidi’s action of bringing Willow home, but only learn bit by bit what tragedy has occurred (no, I won’t tell you what happens, you need to read the book). Pretty Baby is filled with drama and tension on plenty of levels: Heidi’s relationship with Chris, Heidi’s relationship with her daughter Zoe, Chris’s reaction to Willow and Ruby (Willow’s baby), Zoe’s reaction to her mom bringing Willow and Ruby into their home, Heidi has baby envy and it becomes quite evident with her behavior toward Ruby, and more. I enjoyed reading Pretty Baby as much as I enjoyed reading The Good Girl. For those of you that enjoy reading thrillers with a surprise ending or are looking for something a little different to read, grab yourself a copy of Pretty Baby.

Watch the book trailer:



Disclaimer: I received a digital copy of this book for review purposes from the publisher via NetGalley. I was not paid, required, or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”





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Book 273: THE GOOD GIRL Review

The Good Girl by Mary Kubica
ISBN: 9780778316558 (hardcover)
ISBN: 9781488710452 (ebook)
ASIN: B00IB5BSBG (Kindle edition)

Publication date: July 29, 2014

Publisher: Harlequin MIRA


“I’ve been following her for the past few days. I know where she buys her groceries, where she has her dry cleaning done, where she works. I don’t know the color of her eyes or what they look like when she’s scared. But I will.” 

Born to a prominent Chicago judge and his stifled socialite wife, Mia Dennett moves against the grain as a young inner-city art teacher. One night, Mia enters a bar to meet her on-again, off-again boyfriend. But when he doesn’t show, she unwisely leaves with an enigmatic stranger. With his smooth moves and modest wit, at first Colin Thatcher seems like a safe one-night stand. But following Colin home will turn out to be the worst mistake of Mia’s life. 

Colin’s job was to abduct Mia as part of a wild extortion plot and deliver her to his employers. But the plan takes an unexpected turn when Colin suddenly decides to hide Mia in a secluded cabin in rural Minnesota, evading the police and his deadly superiors. Mia’s mother, Eve, and detective Gabe Hoffman will stop at nothing to find them, but no one could have predicted the emotional entanglements that eventually cause this family’s world to shatter. 

An addictively suspenseful and tautly written thriller, The Good Girl is a compulsive debut that reveals how even in the perfect family, nothing is as it seems. . .



If you were to meet Mia Dennett in person you wouldn’t think she came from wealth, but she does. For most of her life Mia has rebelled against her parents and their version of acceptable society. She was the proverbial wild-child and went against her father’s wishes and studied art in college rather than law. As a young twenty-something teacher, Mia has made a life for herself outside the society group she rebelled against. She has limited contact with her parents and is admired by her students and fellow teachers. When Mia doesn’t show up at school for a few days it is her school teacher friend that launches a missing person report, not her parents. Police detective Gabe Hoffman has to literally fight with the Dennett family to prove to them that she did not run away from her responsibilities but may, in fact, have been abducted. The question becomes can Mia be found before it’s too late? Who wanted Mia taken out of the picture and why?

Mary Kubica does an admirable job answering those questions and presenting a view of Mia before, during, and after her abduction. The Mia from before was rather free-spirited but always made sure her students had what they needed. Mia isn’t an irresponsible adult, just a nonconformist. During the abduction she alternates between being subdued, frightened, and angry. Mia after the abduction comes across as fragile and epitomizes the “good girl” daughter her parents always wanted. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I read comparisons between The Good Girl and Gone Girl (usually these comparisons set the reader up for disappointment – this time it didn’t). Yes both stories are thrillers. Yes both stories explore the darker side of humanity. And yes, both stories have an unexpected twist at the end, but those similarities are superficial at best. The Good Girl is simply a darn good read, as was Gone Girl. The characters are multidimensional, realistically flawed, and wholly believable. There are good guys, not so good guys, and bad guys and sometimes it may be difficult to tell who’s a good guy and who’s bad. (Trust me you’ll understand and be able to figure it out while you’re reading the story.) I liked the unexpected twist at the end and never could have predicted it (No! I’m not telling you what the twist is in the story . . . read it!). If you enjoy mystery-suspense thrillers or just want to read a good book then I you’ll definitely want to add The Good Girl to your reading list.



Watch the book trailer:



Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book free for review purposes from the publisher via NetGalley. I was not paid, required or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”



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