Book Spotlight: ONE TRUE LOVES by Taylor Jenkins Reid



One True Loves by Taylor Jenkins Reid
ISBN: 9781476776903 (paperback)
ISBN: 9781476776910 (ebook)
ASIN: B0176M3XWQ (Kindle version)
Publication Date: June 7, 2016 
Publisher: Washington Square Press


From the author of Maybe in Another Life—named a People Magazine pick and a “Best Book of the Summer” by Glamour and USA Today—comes a breathtaking new love story about a woman unexpectedly forced to choose between the husband she has long thought dead and the fiancé who has finally brought her back to life.

In her twenties, Emma Blair marries her high school sweetheart, Jesse. They build a life for themselves, far away from the expectations of their parents and the people of their hometown in Massachusetts. They travel the world together, living life to the fullest and seizing every opportunity for adventure.

On their first wedding anniversary, Jesse is on a helicopter over the Pacific when it goes missing. Just like that, Jesse is gone forever.

Emma quits her job and moves home in an effort to put her life back together. Years later, now in her thirties, Emma runs into an old friend, Sam, and finds herself falling in love again. When Emma and Sam get engaged, it feels like Emma’s second chance at happiness.

That is, until Jesse is found. He’s alive, and he’s been trying all these years to come home to her. With a husband and a fiancé, Emma has to now figure out who she is and what she wants, while trying to protect the ones she loves.

Who is her one true love? What does it mean to love truly?

Emma knows she has to listen to her heart. She’s just not sure what it’s saying.





Meet the author:


Taylor Jenkins Reid is an author, essayist and TV writer from Acton, Mass. Her debut novel, Forever, Interrupted, has been optioned with Dakota Johnson attached to star. She is adapting her second book, After I Do, for ABC Family. Her most recent novel, Maybe In Another Life, has been featured in People, Us Weekly, Cosmo and more.
In addition to her novels, Taylor’s essays have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The Huffington Post, xoJane and a number of other blogs.

She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, Alex, and their dog, Rabbit.




Connect with the author:     Website     |     Facebook     |     Twitter




As a participant in the Book Sparks Summer Reading Challenge 2016 (SRC2016), I’ve been asked to answer a few questions about Ms. Reid…here goes:


  1. The first book I ever read by Taylor Jenkins Reid was After I Do as part of SRC2014.
  2. My Wish for Taylor Jenkins Reid as a Mom is to simply enjoy every moment as your baby will be graduating from high school and leaving home before you know it.
  3. My Wish for Taylor Jenkins Reid as an author is that she becomes just as well-known and beloved as Nora Roberts and Danielle Steele.
  4. My Favorite book by Taylor Jenkins Reid…that’s a difficult choice and I can’t name just one so After I Do and Maybe In Another Life.
  5. Who is your One True Love? My One True Love isn’t a romantic love, it’s a maternal love and it rests with my stepson Abdullah. I never thought I’d have children and being his stepmother has been the best experience I’ve ever had.



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One True Loves: A Novel
One True Loves: A Novel

One True Loves


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One True Loves

One True Loves

One True Loves

Book Showcase: MAYBE IN ANOTHER LIFE by Taylor Jenkins Reid



Maybe In Another Life by Taylor Jenkins Reid
ISBN: 9781476776880 (paperback)
ISBN: 9781476776897 (ebook)
ASIN: B00P42X1P0 (Kindle edition)
Publisher: Washington Square Press
Publication date: July 7, 2015


From the acclaimed author of Forever, Interrupted and After I Do comes a breathtaking new novel about a young woman whose fate hinges on the choice she makes after bumping into an old flame; in alternating chapters, we see two possible scenarios unfold—with stunningly different results.

At the age of twenty-nine, Hannah Martin still has no idea what she wants to do with her life. She has lived in six different cities and held countless meaningless jobs since graduating college. On the heels of leaving yet another city, Hannah moves back to her hometown of Los Angeles and takes up residence in her best friend Gabby’s guestroom. Shortly after getting back to town, Hannah goes out to a bar one night with Gabby and meets up with her high school boyfriend, Ethan.

Just after midnight, Gabby asks Hannah if she’s ready to go. A moment later, Ethan offers to give her a ride later if she wants to stay. Hannah hesitates. What happens if she leaves with Gabby? What happens if she leaves with Ethan?

In concurrent storylines, Hannah lives out the effects of each decision. Quickly, these parallel universes develop into radically different stories with large-scale consequences for Hannah, as well as the people around her. As the two alternate realities run their course, Maybe in Another Life raises questions about fate and true love: Is anything meant to be? How much in our life is determined by chance? And perhaps, most compellingly: Is there such a thing as a soul mate?

Hannah believes there is. And, in both worlds, she believes she’s found him.



Read an excerpt:

Chapter 1


It’s a good thing I booked an aisle seat, because I’m the last one on the plane. I knew I’d be late for my flight. I’m late for almost everything. That’s why I booked an aisle seat in the first place. I hate making people get up so that I can squeeze by. This is also why I never go to the bathroom during movies, even though I always have to go to the bathroom during movies.

I walk down the tight aisle, holding my carry-on close to my body, trying not to bump anyone. I hit a man’s elbow and apologize even though he doesn’t seem to notice. When I barely graze a woman’s arm, she shoots daggers at me as if I stabbed her. I open my mouth to say I’m sorry and then think better of it. 

I spot my seat easily; it’s the only open one.

The air is stale. The music is Muzak. The conversations around me are punctuated by the clicks of the overhead compartments being slammed shut. 

I get to my seat and sit down, smiling at the woman next to me. She’s older and round, with short salt-and-pepper hair. I shove my bag in front of me and buckle my seat belt. My tray table’s up. My electronics are off. My seat is in the upright position. When you’re late a lot, you learn how to make up for lost time. 

I look out the window. The baggage handlers are bundled up in extra layers and neon jackets. I’m happy to be headed to a warmer climate. I pick up the in-flight magazine.

Soon I hear the roar of the engine and feel the wheels beneath us start to roll. The woman next to me grips the armrests as we ascend. She looks petrified. 

I’m not scared of flying. I’m scared of sharks, hurricanes, and false imprisonment. I’m scared that I will never do anything of value with my life. But I’m not scared of flying.

Her knuckles are white with tension.

I tuck the magazine back into the pouch. “Not much of a flier?” I ask her. When I’m anxious, talking helps. If talking helps her, it’s the least I can do. 

The woman turns and looks at me as we glide into the air. “‘Fraid not,” she says, says, smiling ruefully. “I don’t leave New York very often. This is my first time flying to Los Angeles.”

“Well, if it makes you feel any better, I fly a fair amount, and I can tell you, with any flight, it’s really only takeoff and landing that are hard. We’ve got about three more minutes of this part and then about five minutes at the end that can be tough. The rest of it . . . you might as well be on a bus. So just eight bad minutes total, and then you’re in California.”

We’re at an incline. It’s steep enough that an errant bottle of water rolls down the aisle. 

“Eight minutes is all?” she asks. I nod. 

“That’s it,” I tell her. “You’re from New York?” 

She nods. “How about you?”

I shrug. “I was living in New York. Now I’m moving back to L.A.”
The plane drops abruptly and then rights itself as we make our way past the clouds. She breathes in deeply. I have to admit, even I feel a little queasy. 

“But I was only in New York for about nine months,” I say. The longer I talk, the less attention she has to focus on the turbulence. “I’ve been moving around a bit lately. I went to school in Boston. Then I moved to D.C., then Portland, Oregon. Then Seattle. Then Austin, Texas. Then New York. The city where dreams come true. Although, you know, not for me. But I did grow up in Los Angeles. So you could say I’m going back to where I came from, but I don’t know that I’d call it home.”

“Where’s your family?” she asks. Her voice is tight. She’s looking forward.

“My family moved to London when I was sixteen. My younger sister, Sarah, got accepted to the Royal Ballet School, and they couldn’t pass that up. I stayed and finished school in L.A.”

“You lived on your own?” It’s working. The distraction.

“I lived with my best friend’s family until I finished high school. And then I left for college.” 

The plane levels out. The captain tells us our altitude. She takes her hands off the armrest and breathes.

“See?” I say to her. “Just like a bus.” 

“Thank you,” she says. 

“Anytime.” 

She looks out the window. I pick up the magazine again. She turns back to me. “Why do you move around so much?” she says. “Isn’t that difficult?” She immediately corrects herself. “Listen to me, the minute I stop hyperventilating, I’m acting like your mother.” 

I laugh with her. “No, no, it’s fine,” I say. I don’t move from place to place on purpose. It’s not a conscious choice to be a nomad. Although I can see that each move is my own decision, predicated on nothing but my ever-growing sense that I don’t belong where I am, fueled by the hope that maybe there is, in fact, a place I do belong, a place just off in the future. “I guess . . . I don’t know,” I say. It’s hard to put into words, especially to someone I barely know. But then I open my mouth, and out it comes. “No place has felt like home.” 

She looks at me and smiles. “I’m sorry,” she says. “That has to be hard.”

I shrug, because it’s an impulse. It’s always my impulse to ignore the bad, to run toward the good. 

But I’m also not feeling great about my own impulses at the moment. I’m not sure they are getting me where I want to go. 

I stop shrugging. 

And then, because I won’t see her again after this flight, I take it one step further. I tell her something I’ve only recently told myself. “Sometimes I worry I’ll never find a place to call home.” 

She puts her hand on mine, ever so briefly. “You will,” she says. “You’re young still. You have plenty of time.”




Meet the author:

Taylor Jenkins Reid is an author, essayist, and TV writer from Acton, Massachusetts. Her debut novel, Forever, Interrupted, has been optioned with Dakota Johnson attached to star. Her second book, After I Do, was called a “must read” by Kirkus. Her most recent novel, Maybe In Another Life has been featured in People, US Weekly, Cosmo, and more.

In addition to her novels, Taylor’s essays have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, The Huffington Post, xoJane, and a number of other blogs.

She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, Alex, and their dog, Rabbit.


Connect with the author:     Website     |     Facebook     |     Twitter




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Book 243: AFTER I DO Review



After I Do by Taylor Jenkins Reid
ISBN: 9781476712840 (paperback)
ISBN: 9780385534857 (ebook)
ASIN: B00GEEB8UC (Kindle edition)
Publication date: July 1, 2014
Publisher: Washington Square Press


From the author of Forever, Interrupted—hailed by Sarah Jio as “moving, gorgeous, and at times heart-wrenching”—comes a breathtaking new novel about modern marriage, the depth of family ties, and the year that one remarkable heroine spends exploring both.

When Lauren and Ryan’s marriage reaches the breaking point, they come up with an unconventional plan. They decide to take a year off in the hopes of finding a way to fall in love again. One year apart, and only one rule: they cannot contact each other. Aside from that, anything goes.

Lauren embarks on a journey of self-discovery, quickly finding that her friends and family have their own ideas about the meaning of marriage. These influences, as well as her own healing process and the challenges of living apart from Ryan, begin to change Lauren’s ideas about monogamy and marriage. She starts to question: When you can have romance without loyalty and commitment without marriage, when love and lust are no longer tied together, what do you value? What are you willing to fight for?

This is a love story about what happens when the love fades. It’s about staying in love, seizing love, forsaking love, and committing to love with everything you’ve got. And above all, After I Do is the story of a couple caught up in an old game—and searching for a new road to happily ever after.



Lauren and Ryan met in college and fell in love. After graduation they moved in together and eventually got married. They’ve been together eleven years. They were blissfully happy for years but they’ve grown apart. After one argument too many, they make the decision to separate for one year and then re-evaluate their relationship. Can they survive being apart? Can their marriage survive the time apart? How do you know what you want when you no longer know who you are without the other person? These are just a few of the questions Mr. Reid attempts to answer in her novel After I Do.

Being in a relationship is hard work. Being in a marriage is hard work. Being true to yourself is even harder. Lauren and Ryan assume that they are no longer in love with one another because of their constant anger toward one another. What do you do when you can’t love the person you’re with? For Lauren and Ryan the answer is to separate. After I Do provides a fascinating glimpse into this separation from Lauren’s perspective and through her interactions with friends and family. Unfortunately (or fortunately depending on how you look at it) her family loves Ryan just as much as they love her and can’t quite grasp why they’ve separated. Lauren receives advice from her maternal grandmother Lois, her sister Rachel, her brother Charlie, her mother Lesley, and her co-worker Mila. Everyone seems to have a different opinion on what works and what won’t. Over the course of this year Lauren learns quite a bit about herself and life, including the following: it is acceptable to be alone, separating from her husband and even getting a divorce (if it goes that far) doesn’t mean she’s a failure, it’s okay to not like something the other person likes, compromise is necessary in all relationships, and most important — life goes on.

There aren’t any good guys or bad guys in After I Do. Ms. Reid has portrayed a young couple in turmoil and their struggle to survive. The relationships portrayed, from single-mother Lesley to widowed grandmother Lois, are all quite realistic. Lesley and Lois are from different generations and their perspectives on life are viewed through the lenses of their experiences and upbringing. I liked the notion that even when the family didn’t necessarily agree with Lauren they continued to support her wholeheartedly. Although the majority of the story is committed to the idea of marriage and what happens after the vows are exchanged, I enjoyed reading about Lauren’s interactions with her brother and sister just as much as I enjoyed the dilemma she faced with Ryan. I found After I Do to be a fast-paced read that isn’t so much a happy-ever-after but a hopeful-ever-after. If you enjoy realistic, contemporary stories about relationships and self-discovery then grab a copy of After I Do as soon as possible. Be forewarned, this is a story that will make you smile, laugh, and even cry. 


Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book free for review purposes via BookSparks PR. I was not paid, required or otherwise obligated to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”


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